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'We will never sell another 59p app': ustwo calls for a Braveheart moment

'We will never sell another 59p app': ustwo calls for a Braveheart moment
Developers' dissatisfaction with the way App Store pricing collapsed during 2009 towards the 99c, €0.79 or 59p minimum has been growing for months.

However there's not been much consolidated action to move things in the other direction, yet...

In keeping with its fiercely independent status, UK/Swedish studio ustwo has confirmed it won't be using the 59p price point any more, and has repriced all its current apps to £1.19.

"We value the work we do, and 59p is as good as saying its free. It's a price that is impossible to cover costs," states creative director mills.

A call to wallets

His manifest on the subject of pricing is argued below:

"The main problem quality developers are facing is that the App Store is fast becoming a pit of mediocracy simply because of price point. Consumers quite frankly have been spoilt and are becoming accustomed to lower prices and this is forcing developers to react accordingly.

"As far as we're concerned 59p is as good as free, and that price suggests to me (the developer) that I don't value what I've created. Something that's taken months of effort to create, ongoing work to promote and taking into account Apple's cut, all I'm left with after a sale is a lowly 49p - the price of a Mars bar. And what does the user get for that? A highly polished slice of entertainment.

"At that price things just don't add up. We are proud of what we have achieved and created; and we will no longer be forced to compete on price point alone. As of this day forward, we have raised the price of our first four paid apps from 59p to the new minimum standard £1.19 price point.

"This is our Braveheart moment. If people are not willing to pay at least £1.19, then why are we in this game?"

The pricing revolution starts here.



Contributing Editor

A Pocket Gamer co-founder, Jon is Contributing Editor at PG.biz which means he acts like a slightly confused uncle who's forgotten where he's left his glasses. As well as letters and cameras, he likes imaginary numbers and legumes.

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