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Assassin's Creed Shadows on iOS is setting a new standard for mobile gaming

Apple aims to unify the gaming experience across iPhone, iPad, and Mac with a little help from some big name triple-A partners
Assassin's Creed Shadows on iOS is setting a new standard for mobile gaming
  • Apple is demonstrating that mobile devices are now capable of delivering the same experience reserved for consoles and PCs
  • If it all goes to plan, this could be the start of something big

At their Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) this week Apple shared that Assassin's Creed Shadows, in its full console and PC glory, will be coming to iOS and Mac OS on November 15th 2024

This move follows on the heels of the launch of Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed Mirage on iOS which signaled a bold new step for Apple into the world of triple-A games.

Historically, mobile has only ever seen scaled-down versions of their console and PC counterparts. However, with the full-sized version of Resident Evil Village, Resident Evil 4, Death Stranding: Directors Cut, Assassin's Creed Mirage and now Assassin's Creed Shadows coming to iOS, Apple is pushing the point that mobile devices are now capable of delivering gameplay experiences traditionally reserved for consoles and PCs. 

And new features such as Game Mode just make them all the more able.

Strengthening its ecosystem 

And, more than last year's toe-dipping, Assassin's Creed Shadows launch on iOS is a line in the sand that Apple is positioning its desktops, laptops and mobile devices as viable alternatives to the dominant gaming PC and traditional gaming consoles.

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The benefits of this approach are manifold. For one, it simplifies the gaming experience for users, allowing them to play games on any Apple device they own without compromising on quality, which could attract gamers who value convenience and flexibility. Why buy that game anywhere else?

Secondly, their hardware (with M series chips in their deskops, laptops and iPad and the next revision of the already game-ready A17 Pro on the way) really is in a place where users can say: "I've got a desktop/laptop and that can run the game… And I've got a tablet and mobile that can run it too… Why do I need a console?" 

I've got a desktop/laptop and that can run the game… And I've got a tablet and mobile that can run it too… Why do I need a console?

Who needs dedicated gaming hardware?

While this won't spell the end of traditional gaming consoles just yet, Apple's recent moves certainly suggest a future where dedicated gaming hardware is less essential as the 'must haves' as home computer and mobile are more than up to the job.

And the more big names like Assassin's Creed that Apple gets on board with cross-hardware day one launches (that look, and play well), the more they can prove that their approach works and the more it's likely to succeed. 

The endgame

Apple's dream is that triple-A game devs can make a single game that runs on all their hardware and just as well as any console. High end gaming PCs are on the rise and consoles are in decline right now. Apple clearly feel that their Mac and iPad (and even the not-to-far-behind iPhone) can not only keep up, but are in a position to edge ahead, with cross-platform portability an added bonus.

Of course the plan may fall down when/if PlayStation and Xbox make new machines that leapfrog what Apple (and similarly PC and Android) can offer. But right now, thanks to big name sign-ons like Assassin's Creed Shadows and Apple's processor push, desktop and mobile have caught up with consoles and triple-A can be everywhere.