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Razer wants to be carbon neutral by 2030

Firm has committed to running entirely on renewable energy by 2025 and use recycled or recyclable materials for its products

Razer wants to be carbon neutral by 2030

Games peripheral specialist Razer has outlined its plans for climate sustainability for the next ten years.

In a post on its website, the firm revealed its #GoGreenWithRazer campaign, saying that it intended to move to 100 per cent renewable energy by 2025, something that it has apparently already achieved with its European office in Hamburg, Germany. Its new Singapore headquarters will also use renewable energy.

Meanwhile, the company says that all of its products would be made from recycled or recyclable materials by 2030. People who want to get rid of their existing hardware can return them to RazerStore so they can be recycled, free-of-charge.

Environmentally friendly

By 2030, Razer also intends to be completely carbon neutral. The company has already planted one million trees via a partnership with Conservation International and the sales of eco-friendly merchandise to fans.

“Through our #GoGreenWithRazer campaign led by our Sneki Snek mascot, the Razer community has been insanely supportive and passionate,” the company's CEO and co-founder Min-Liang Tan (pictured) said.

“Awareness of how we impact the environment is incredibly important. Hence, Razer has planned out a sustainability roadmap to continue fighting environmental and climate changes. We’re determined to make the world a better place for all of its citizens to game and live in.”

This story first appeared on PCGamesInsider.biz.


PCGamesInsider Contributing Editor

Alex Calvin is a freelance journalist who writes about the business of games. He started out at UK trade paper MCV in 2013 and left as deputy editor over three years later. In June 2017, he joined Steel Media as the editor for new site PCGamesInsider.biz. In October 2019 he left this full-time position at the company but still contributes to the site on a daily basis. He has also written for GamesIndustry.biz, VGC, Games London, The Observer/Guardian and Esquire UK.

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