Data & Research

Tapjoy and comScore detail the power of rewarded in-game ads for brands

The right way to advertise

Tapjoy and comScore detail the power of rewarded in-game ads for brands

As we recently pointed out, there's a lot of data floating around the mobile games industry.

But unless you understand how that data was collected, it's impossible to tell if it's good or not.

US mobile monetisation outfit Tapjoy has also realised this, which is why its recent study into the value of rewarded video ads in mobile games took two years to complete.

The set-up

With with audience measurement experts comScore, it analysed mobile ad campaigns from 14 US major brands from 2014 to 2015, comparing the behaviour of people who saw the ads against a control group which didn't.

Of course, the two groups were matched in terms of age, gender and, in some cases, category usage to ensure it was a valid comparison of equals.

The brands included the likes of Olive Garden, Dodge, LEGO, Sephora, Norwegian Cruise Line, am/pm, Citi and Huggies.

Big results

As for the results, the rewarded video ads run through Tapjoy's platform increased what it labels "mobile norms" across the board.

  • Aided awareness was up 7.6 times,
  • Mobile ad recall was up 2 times,
  • Message association was up 5.3 times,
  • Brand favorability was up 3.3 times,
  • Likelihood to recommend was up 1.4 times, and
  • Purchase/consideration intent was up 2.3 times.

"This study with Tapjoy shows that mobile ads, when integrated into mobile games at contextually relevant moments with the right rewards, can deliver strong branding results that help advertisers meet or exceed their objectives, commented Steven Millman, SVP, Research at comScore.

"As more brands prove out the efficacy of their mobile ads campaigns, we should see this segment of the digital ad market realize its full potential."

To view the complete report, please email advertise@tapjoy.com.


Contributing Editor

A Pocket Gamer co-founder, Jon is Contributing Editor at PG.biz which means he acts like a slightly confused uncle who's forgotten where he's left his glasses. As well as letters and cameras, he likes imaginary numbers and legumes.

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